Siberian permafrost worms more than 42000 years back to life

Tinuku - Russian scientists report that it has succeeded in reviving two species of worms that have been frozen for more than 40,000 years. Two species of frozen nematodes of the roundworm are 30,000 and 42,000 years old. The discovery was made by four different institutions in Moscow in collaboration with Princeton University.

Initially, researchers wanted to know whether multicellular organisms could be revived after "falling asleep" for long periods of time in extreme cold. For that purpose, they explored the cold eastern region of Russia and collected 300 samples of soil freezing so often called permafrost.

Tinuku Siberian permafrost worms more than 42000 years back to life

Permafrost deposits of various ages and regions in Siberia are brought to the laboratory and seek to revive the organisms in the sediment. The results are surprising, the scientists managed to extract to trace the historical life of the creature from two samples that have been collected.

One sample was collected from a fossilized squirrel hole near the Alazeya River in northeastern Yakutia in a 32,000-year-old deposit. Other permafrost samples are from the Kolyma River in northeastern Siberia and the nearest sedimentary age is about 42,000 years.

Tinuku.com Siberian permafrost worms more than 42000 years back to life

"We have obtained the first data showing the ability of these multicellular organisms to fall asleep in the long term in Arctic permafrost.The duration of natural cryopreservation of nematodes corresponds to the age of deposits between 30,000 and 40,000 years," the researchers said.

The team reported findings in the May 2018 issue of Doklady Biological Sciences that represent the first evidence of multicellular organisms that reside in Arctic permafrost. Although the size is only about 1 millimeter, the nematodes are known to have impressive abilities.

www.tinuku.com Siberian permafrost worms more than 42000 years back to life

This animal is known to live 1.3 meters below the soil surface. That is, they can live more deeply than other multicellular animals. However, nematodes are not the first organisms that awaken after thousands of years of freezing in ice. Previously, another group of scientists had identified the revived giant virus after spending 30,000 years frozen on a Siberian permafrost.

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